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About 10 hours ago from Green Cincinnati's Twitter via HubSpot

Recycle Everything

Let’s start at the office and go from there:

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Acceptable Items for Recycling
Rumpke Recycling offers residential customers a convenient, comprehensive recycling program to enhance the recycling effort and reduce the amount of material sent to the landfill.
While the full list of acceptable materials may vary slightly in some locations, residents can typically recycle the following:
Glass Bottles & Jars (all colors)
Metal Cans: Aluminum cans, steel cans and lids, empty aerosol cans with the lids and tips removed
Plastic Bottles (empty, crush, reattach lid): Bottles and jugs that have a small mouth and wider base, such as milk jugs, soda bottles, laundry detergent bottles, water bottles, shampoo bottles and contact solution bottles
Paper: newspaper, magazines, cardboard, mixed office paper and envelopes, paperboard (cereal boxes), pizza boxes free of food debris and grease, telephone books and catalogs
Cartons: food and beverage cartons, such as milk, juice, soup, wine, broth and other cartons.
Recycling Tips
Mix all items together – no separation required
Empty all bottles, jugs and cans
No need to remove labels
For plastic bottles, empty, crush and reattach lids
For cartons, remove plastic caps and straws
NEVER place medical sharps or needles in the recycling
DON’T use plastic bags
NOT for Recycling
No plastic bags, cassette tapes, bed sheets, hangers, metal chains, garden hoses, batteries, needles, syringes, electronics, buckets, butter tubs, car parts, food, yard waste, light bulbs, drinking glasses, ceramics, pots, pans, and scrap metal

Aluminum Foil: Most recyclers require that foil is clean and intact to be collected for recycling. It is not always accepted with other aluminum products. Recycle at Kentucky eScrap, 7430 Industrial Rd, Florence, KY or Compton Recycling, 2551 Compton Rd, Cincinnati, OH (from http://www.earth911.com/recycling-guide/how-to-recycle-aluminum-foil/)

Aluminum Pie Plates and Trays: Most recyclers require that the plates and trays are clean and intact to be collected for recycling. It is not always accepted with other aluminum products. Recycle at Compton Recycling, 2551 Compton Rd, Cincinnati, OH (from http://www.earth911.com/recycling-guide/how-to-recycle-aluminum-foil/)

Compost: Take home and put in garden

E-Waste: Recycle at Kentucky eScrap, 7430 Industrial Rd, Florence, KY or Cincinnati Computer Cooperative, 49 Novner Drive
Cincinnati, OH 45215, http://cincinnaticomputercooperative.org

Light bulbs:

Cloth: Old towels, etc.

Ceramics broken plates, etc.: Find a place that accepts them for crushing and placement into new brick or other products (from http://zerowasteinstitute.org/?page_id=56)

Non-ferrous metals such as brass, copper, etc. and steel not taken by Rumke, knife blades, etc.: Recycle at Garden Street Iron & Metal, 2815 Spring Grove Avenue, Cincinnati, OH (from http://www.earth911.com/recycling-guide/how-to-recycle-metal/)

Plastics not taken by Rumke: (from http://environment.about.com/od/earthtalkcolumns/a/recycleplastics.htm)

Number 1 is the easiest and most common plastics to recycle are made of polyethylene terephthalate (PETE). Examples include soda and water bottles, medicine containers, and many other common consumer product containers. Rumke doesn’t take tubs, and other containers that have an opening wider than the base. Once it has been processed by a recycling facility, PETE can become fiberfill for winter coats, sleeping bags and life jackets. It can also be used to make bean bags, rope, car bumpers, tennis ball felt, combs, cassette tapes, sails for boats, furniture and, of course, other plastic bottles.

Number 2 is high-density polyethylene plastics. These include heavier containers that hold laundry detergents and bleaches as well as milk, shampoo and motor oil. Rumke doesn’t take tubs, and other containers that have an opening wider than the base. Plastic labeled with the number 2 is often recycled into toys, piping, plastic lumber and rope.

Number 3 is polyvinyl chloride, commonly used in plastic pipes, shower curtains, medical tubing, vinyl dashboards, and even some baby bottle nipples

Number 4 includes wrapping films, grocery and sandwich bags, and other containers made of low-density polyethylene

Number 5 is polypropylene containers used in Tupperware, among other products

Number 6 is polystyrene (Styrofoam) items such as coffee cups, disposable cutlery, meat trays, packing “peanuts” and insulation. It is widely accepted because it can be reprocessed into many items, including cassette tapes and rigid foam insulation. Packing peanuts can be taken to the PostalAnnex, 6539 Harrison Ave, Cincinnati, OH (from http://www.earth911.com/recycling-guide/how-to-recycle-packing-peanuts/)

Number 7 includes items crafted from various combinations of the aforementioned plastics or from unique plastic formulations not commonly used. Usually imprinted with a number 7 or nothing at all, these plastics are the most difficult to recycle and, as such, are seldom collected or recycled. More ambitious consumers can feel free to return such items to the product manufacturers to avoid contributing to the local waste stream, and instead put the burden on the makers to recycle or dispose of the items properly.

 

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